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Is our dojo right for you?

What are Jujitsu and Aiki Jujitsu?

What Martial Art is the best?

What are the rank requirements?

How long does it take to get a black belt?

Will I get hurt?

What is the minimum age to join the Dojo?

What equipment is needed to practice Jujitsu?

How do I join?

Are there any contracts?

Where is the Dojo located?

What is the differance between Jujitsu and Karate?

Will I win trophies in Jujitsu?

 

 

 

What are Jujitsu and Aiki Jujitsu?
Jujitsu and Aiki Jujitsu are the oldest forms of Japanese Martial Arts on record.  There has been much debate over their actual origins, but most people will agree that Jujitsu, as a formalized style, started around 880 A.D. The fighting techniques of ancient Japan developed into two distinct methods. The oldest form of Jujitsu was known as Aiki Jujitsu. This type of Jujitsu was used by the military elite and members of the royal court, mainly while inside the castle or compound.  The other method, simply called Jujutsu, was used to train the masses of regular soldiers and was a rougher, less-refined style. Although techniques may vary from one style to the other, these techniques all were designed for combat effectiveness.  Aiki Jujitsu currently is known more for its blending and joint manipulation techniques, whereas Jujitsu is known more for its grappling, throwing, and ground fighting techniques.

 

What Martial Art is the best?
The answer really depends upon the reason that the student wants to learn a Martial Art. Some Martial Arts are more for sport purposes than others. For these styles to be safe for competition, the most effective techniques must be removed to prevent significant injuries. Most striking-only styles at this point are best used for sport only. If self-defense is your ONLY reason for training in the Martial Arts, we believe that Jujitsu is the only answer for you.

 

What are the rank requirements?
In our Dojo, the techniques and requirements for each rank are posted on the walls for each belt rank. Students must be able to demonstrate the techniques for their current rank proficiently, as well as have a noted high level of Dojo etiquette. As students progress on to higher ranks, more understanding of the principles underlying the techniques is required, as well as being able to use what they have learned in unrehearsed self-defense scenarios.

 

How long does it take to get a black belt?
We usually hesitate to answer this question, because earning a Black belt should not be the reason for training in the Martial Arts.  There is a great misconception about what a black belt really means. It usually is looked upon as a sign that one has finished or mastered one’s training, but this perception could not be further from the truth. In a way, the Black belt only is the beginning of what is considered a higher level of training and understanding. Many legitimate high-ranking instructors, who are the best we have to offer in the Martial Arts, still consider themselves beginners. There are just too many things to learn and understand to really "Master" the martial arts. That being said, it depends upon the individual student’s willingness to learn and their skill level as to how long it takes to attain a black belt. Approximately 4-5 years of active training is average.

 

Will I get hurt?
Students will get bumps and bruised from time to time; however, injuries that require medical attention are VERY UNCOMMON. It is the responsibility of the Instructors to continually assess the skill level of all students, to ensure that they are ready to move on to more difficult material without being injured.

 

What is the minimum age to join the Dojo?
Because what we teach requires a high level of attention, control, and maturity to learn and understand, it is our opinion that Jujitsu and Aiki Jujitsu are not well suited for young children. We have seen that some children do have these qualities at a younger age and, therefore, in certain circumstances we will make exceptions.  In general, 15-16 years old is about the youngest we will accept.

 

What equipment is needed to practice Jujitsu?
Only a Judo/Jujitsu uniform and a protective cup (for male students) is required. The uniforms are around $50.00 and can be purchased from us or anywhere you like.


How do I join?
Because we only accept new students by means of a favorable decision of the Sensei and other ranked members, all new students must fill out an application, attend a class, and speak to Sensei or another delegated member to be approved. It is not a painful process. It truly is just to ensure that our school is right for you and that we receive a respectful student who is willing to learn and not be an unnecessary danger to the other members.

 

Are there any contracts?
Never! We only want students who want to train with us. Making students sign a contract (for example, to train for a year) makes students who want to quit feel some obligation to still come to class, because they think they owe us a year’s worth of dues. However, a student who is not happy training here is not helping himself/herself or the Dojo. That is why we work on a month-to-month basis. If ever you want to quit, we wish you well, and hope you feel you have gained something from your time with us.

 

Where is the Dojo located?
We are in Aiken, South Carolina, having recently built a state-of-the-art facility located on Sensei Barry's property. Without having high overhead, we can have lower monthly dues and be able to offer training to potential students who might not be able to afford a higher rate. For directions, contact us to set up a time to meet with us.

 

What is the difference between Jujitsu and Karate?
Karate is known as a striking art, because it primarily uses punches kicks, and blocks along with forms which are pre-arranged movements incorporating said techniques.  It also is practiced throughout the world as a sport, including many rules of engagement for safety. This is a generalization, however.  Jujitsu, on the other hand, is not a sport and cannot be used as such unless many of the techniques are removed for safety. At that point, many argue whether or not it still is Jujitsu. The underlying physics behind the two arts also is completely different. For example, in Karate, to block a strike you must stop it or redirect it with whatever force required.  The harder the punch, the harder the block must be. Jujitsu, on the other hand, allows the punch to come in; however, using a combination of evasion, yielding, and many other principles, it uses the force of the attack to enact a successful defense. Actually, if one uses the principles of Jujitsu properly, the harder the punch comes in, the less strength is needed to defend against it. These are very simplified scenarios; however, for the purpose for which the question is posed we feel it works. Using this theory, with Jujitsu it is possible to defend against a stronger, larger attacker. Also, the simple fact is that with Jujitsu, there are no rules or banned techniques that have been taken out. Basically, you do whatever is necessary to protect yourself. Self preservation or the defense of another from real attack is the goal.

  

Will I win trophies in Jujitsu?
Not in this Dojo.  Sport Martial Arts require many rules for safety. These rules must remove the most effective self-defense techniques from competition.  Those who get used to practicing for sport competition instinctively will try to use these sporting techniques in a real self-defense situation. We have found that, in virtually every situation we have researched, you use what you have practiced the most to try to defend yourself. Many sport-oriented schools try to split your training between self-defense and sport competition. The problem is that you subconsciously will do what you have been trained to do the most in practice. If most or all of your training is not for self-defense, you are putting yourself at risk when the time comes to use your training for real. Potential students must decide between sport and self-defense before joining a Dojo.



 
Budokai South Defensive Arts Institute
Minami Budo Ryu
Ju Jitsu / Aiki Jujitsu / Judo / Self Defense
Aiken, SC
Phone:(843) 864-3125
Email: newtobudokai@gmail.com


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